Posts Tagged ‘cajun food’

Cajun brunch 8 recipe series

Posted: February 14, 2017 in Recipes
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cajun_brunchThis is one post you can’t just hit the like button, you’ll have to read the entire post of recipes, I have bunched them all together because today is Valentines day and you might want to group a few of these together for your brunch or brunch party

BANANAS FOSTER FRENCH TOAST

This is not diet food.

2 cups heavy cream
2 extra-large eggs, beaten
1 egg yolk, beaten
1/4 teaspoon vanilla extract
3 tablespoons sugar
1 tablespoon cinnamon
4 slices brioche or Challah
4 tablespoons unsalted butter
3 tablespoons canola oil
4 ripe bananas, sliced in 1/4-inch rounds
3 tablespoons confectioner’s sugar
In a large bowl combine the cream, eggs and vanilla and mix thoroughly. In another, smaller bowl, mix together the sugar and cinnamon. Dip the slices of bread briefly in the cream mixture and sprinkle the cinnamon sugar on both sides. Meanwhile, melt 1 tablespoon of butter and 2 tablespoons of canola oil in a large sauté pan. When the butter mixture is hot, add the bread, 2 slices at a time and saute on each side until golden brown, about 1 minute per side. Remove and reserve the slices and saute the remaining slices. As an option, you may deep fry the slices at this point at 350 degrees for about 30 seconds to make the toast extra-crisp.
Heat the remaining butter and oil in another saute pan. Sprinkle the bananas with the cinnamon sugar, add them to the pan and saute until the bananas are well coated and caramelized.

Place 2 slices of French toast, overlapping, on each of 2 plates and pour the bananas over them. Dust them with the confectioner’s sugar shaken from a strainer or shaker. Serve immediately.

Yield: 2 servings

Crème Brûlée Lost Bread

PREP TIME: 1 ½ hours
SERVES: 6

   
COMMENT:
One of the most interesting breakfast dishes came about because of a need to use stale or "lost bread." There are numerous recipes in and around New Orleans for this traditional dish, but Crème Brûlée is one of the most unique.

INGREDIENTS:

12 French bread croutons, cut 1-inch thick
½ cup melted butter
1 cup brown sugar, lightly packed
2 tbsps honey
5 eggs
1 cup milk
½ cup heavy whipping cream
1/8 tsp cinnamon
1/8 tsp nutmeg
1 tbsp vanilla
1 tbsp praline liqueur or Frangelico

METHOD:

French bread croutons should be cut out of a baguette-style loaf. These slices should be approximately 2 ½ – 3 inched in diameter and 1 inch thick. In a cast iron skillet, combine butter, brown sugar and honey over medium-high heat. Cook mixture, stirring constantly, until bubbly and sugar has dissolved. Pour Brûlée into the bottom of a 13" x 19" x 2" baking dish. Allow Brûlée to cool slightly then top with the French bread croutons. In a large mixing bowl, whisk eggs, milk, whipping cream, cinnamon, nutmeg, vanilla and liqueur. Blend thoroughly the pour evenly over the croutons. Using the tips of your fingers, press bread down gently to force the custard into the croutons without breaking. Cover dish with clear wrap and chill overnight. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Allow custard to sit out at room temperature, approximately 1 hour. Bake, uncovered, until French toast is puffed and edges of the croutons are golden brown, approximately 40 minutes. Allow to cool 10 minutes prior to serving. When ready to serve, remove 2 of the Lost Bread Croutons per guest and invert them onto the center of a 10-inch plate. Top with powdered sugar and drizzle lightly with honey.

CREOLE RICE CALAS:
Fried rice cakes

What are calas? (or, "I’ve got all this leftover rice, NOW WHAT DO I DO?") Calas are fried balls of rice and dough that are eaten covered with powdered sugar, not unlike rice-filled beignets.

"The way it has been told to me is that long ago, on cold mornings in New Orleans, women would walk the streets of the French Quarter selling these warm fried cakes for breakfast.

6 tablespoons flour
3 heaping tablespoons sugar
2 teaspoons baking powder
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon vanilla
2 cups cooked rice
2 eggs
Pinch of nutmeg
Cooking oil
Powdered Sugar
Mix together the flour, sugar, baking powder, salt, and vanilla. Thoroughly mix the rice and eggs together in a separate bowl. Add the dry ingredients to the rice and egg mixture. When thoroughly mixed, drop by spoonfuls into the hot deep fat (about 360 degrees F) and fry until brown. Drain on paper towel. Sprinkle with powdered sugar and serve while hot.
"Other variations are to serve with honey or (my favorite) Steen’s Cane Syrup instead of the powdered sugar.

"Serve with a cup of coffee that is

EGGS PONTCHARTRAIN

8 English muffins, split
16 slices bacon
32 oysters, shucked
16 ounces buttermilk
Flour and cornmeal for breading
Creole seasoning
Oil for deep-frying
16 poached eggs
Finely chopped flat-leaf parsley
Tasso Hollandaise sauce
6 egg yolks
1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
1/2 teaspoon salt
Dashes of Tabasco sauce, to taste
2 tablespoons water
3 sticks (12 ounces) butter, melted and clarified, held warm
8 ounces tasso ham, finely chopped, rendered, drippings reserved
Cook the bacon (it’s easiest on a sheet pan in the oven) until crisp. Reserve the drippings for another use. Break each slice in half.
Butter the muffins and toast in a regular or toaster oven; keep warm.

Poach the eggs in barely simmering water to which a couple of teaspoons of vinegar have been added, until desired doneness (I like runny yolks, mmmm.) You can hold in a pan and refresh with hot water before serving.

Soak the oysters in buttermilk for a few minutes, then roll in a mixture of half flour and half cornmeal that has been seasoned with Creole seasoning, salt and freshly ground black pepper. Shake the oysters in a sieve to get rid of excess breading, then drop into hot oil at 360°F; fry until golden brown. Season with a little more salt and Creole seasoning as soon as they come out of the oil; drain on paper towels and keep warm.

For the tasso Hollandaise: In a stainless steel bowl set over a pot of simmering water over medium heat, whisk the egg yolks with the lemon juice, salt, Tabasco, and water until pale yellow and slightly thick and ribbony. (The old test — you should be able to "blow a rose" on the surface.) Never let the bowl touch the water, and never let the water boil. Off the heat, drizzle the clarified butter into the egg yolks in a thin stream, whisking like hell all the while, until it’s incorporated. Add the tasso and drippings and continue whisking for 30 seconds. Serve immediately or hold in a Thermos to keep warm.

Assembly: Place two muffin halves on each warmed plate. Top each muffin half with two half-slices of bacon and two fried oysters. Top each bacon-oyster muffin with a poached egg. Top with liberal amounts of tasso Hollandaise. Garnish with a bit of parsley and serve.

YIELD: 8 decadent brunch servings.

SPINACH AND TASSO BREAD PUDDING
with Gruyère cheese

This recipe is enough to feed about 12 people. You could cut it into 16 small slices or 8 humongous slices, depending on how much you want to serve or how hungry everyone is. Use a 9×13" baking pan for this amount, but it’s easily cut in half for smaller gatherings. Use an 8×8" pan if you’re halving, and cut the cooking time by about 5-8 minutes.

One 16-ounce loaf of good, crusty French bread
3 tablespoons unsalted butter
4 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
1 medium sweet onion, finely chopped (or substitute red onion)
6-10 cloves garlic, minced (however much you like)
Two 10-ounce packages of frozen chopped spinach, thawed and squeezed dry with squeezings reserved
8 ounces tasso ham, cut into 1/4" dice (or substitute regular smoked ham, andouille sausage or any good smoked sausage)
Salt and freshly ground black pepper
1 cup medium-dry white wine, such as Pinot Grigio (a good one from Friuli) or Sauvignon Blanc. Don’t use Chardonnay.
12 ounces Gruyère cheese, grated (substitute a good Swiss or Monterey jack)
12 large eggs
3-1/2 cups half-and-half
2 tablespoons molasses
A few dashes Worcestershire sauce
Several dashes hot sauce (I love Tabasco Chipotle Sauce with this, for it adds a nice complement of smokiness to the tasso. Use a Mexican chipotle sauce, or just good ol’ Tabasco, Crystal, Cajun Chef or Texas Pete, whatever you like)
Creole seasoning blend
Slice the bread into 1/2" slices and let dry out overnight. You may also dry them in a 200-225°F oven for about 30-40 minutes until they’re completely dried; make sure you don’t brown them.
Heat 2 tablespoons of the olive oil in a large heavy skillet (don’t use non-stick), then add the diced tasso. Brown the tasso for about 5 minutes until some of the fat has been rendered out and you’ve got some nice brown bits stuck to the bottom of the pan. Put the tasso on a plate lined with a few paper towels and set aside. Add the wine to the pan, making sure to scrape up all the browned bits with a spatula, and reduce the wine by half. Pour out into a large bowl or 2-3 quart measuring cup and set aside.

Melt 2 tablespoons of the butter with the rest of the olive oil in the same skillet, then add the onions and garlic. Sauté the onions and garlic for about 3 minutes, until they’re translucent and smelling really fragrant. Add the spinach water and let it reduce almost entirely, then add the chopped spinach and thoroughly combine with the onions and garlic. Continue to cook for 3 minutes or so, making sure that there’s hardly any moisture left. Transfer to a bowl and set aside.

Whisk the eggs together in a large bowl until thoroughly combined, then add the half-and-half. Add the molasses, Worcestershire, hot sauce, the reduced wine, about 2 teaspoons of salt, plenty of fresh ground black pepper and Creole seasoning to taste.

Butter the bottom and sides of the baking dish with the remaining tablespoon of butter (use more if you need it), then make one layer of dried bread slices on the bottom. Use little broken-off pieces if you need to fill any little spaces. Sprinkle about 1/3 of the cheese over the bread, then cover the bread layer evenly with the sautéed spinach mixture, then sprinkle evenly with another 1/3 of the grated cheese, then spread the diced tasso evenly over that and finish off with the rest of the cheese. Season with more Creole seasoning and pepper, then place a second layer of bread over that middle layer, filling the holes with broken pieces as needed.

Give the custard a final mix with the whisk and pour evenly over the entire surface of the bread, making sure you wet everything. Season the top with more black pepper and Creole seasoning and a sprinkling of salt, then wrap the pudding thoroughly in plastic wrap and weight the top down. You can use a couple of boxes of brown sugar or something like that, but I found that a telephone book worked perfectly. This helps compress the layers of the pudding so that the custard will soak all the way through and so that it’ll cook more evenly. Refrigerate for at least 2 hours or overnight.

When you’re ready to get going, take the pudding out of the fridge and let it come to room temperature for about a half an hour, then bake in a preheated oven at 325-350°F for about one hour, until the edges and center are puffed up. Let the pudding cool for about 5 minutes, then slice and serve.

For a brunch side dish I made a fruit salad with whatever looked good at the Farm Fresh Market, and made a dressing by reducing 1 quart of orange juice to about a cup, thickening it with about 2 teaspoons of cornstarch in water, adding the juice of two limes and a few tablespoons of Grand Marnier (strain the dressing before using). Toss and serve.

For a vegetable I blanched fresh green beans (about 3-4 ounces per person) in salted water, then shocked them in ice water to stop the cooking and set them aside. That morning as the pudding was baking I took the largest red onion I could find, quartered it and thinly sliced it, heated about 1/2 cup or so of extra-virgin olive oil in a heavy skillet and started slowly caramelizing it — high heat for about 3 minutes, then as low as you can go for an hour. While that got started I peeled about a dozen cloves of garlic, sliced them as thin as I could get them, then threw those in. Then I finely julienned a couple of carrots, slicing super-thin slices with a vegetable peeler then cutting those slices as a julienne, then threw those in for the last 20 minutes or so of the caramelization. While the pudding was cooling I tossed the beans with the caramelized onion/garlic/carrot "dressing", sprinkled on some toasted pine nuts, seasoned with salt and pepper and stuck the bowl in the oven to warm slightly.

Hell of a brunch, if’n I do so say so myself.

 

GRILLADES AND GRITS

8 thinly pounded veal escallopes, about 3 ounces each
1/2 cup (1 stick) butter
1/2 cup olive oil
1/2 cup onion, finely chopped
1/2 cup green onions, finely chopped
3 cloves garlic, minced
1-1/2 cups bell pepper, finely chopped
1/2 cup celery, finely chopped
1 bay leaf
1-1/2 teaspoons Italian seasoning blend
4 ripe tomatoes, diced
1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce
2 tablespoons tomato paste
1 quart beef stock
2 tablespoons cornstarch
1/4 cup cool water
2 tablespoons fresh parsley, chopped
Salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
Cooked grits

Season veal escallopes on each side with salt and pepper. Heat butter in a large skillet and sauté the veal until it is lightly browned, about 3 minutes per side. Transfer cooked meat to a platter and hold in a warm oven whilie prepping the sauce.
Heat olive oil in a large saucepan. Sauté the onion, green onion, bell pepper, garlic and celery until tender. Stir in bayleaf and Italian seasoning, and add the tomatoes, tomato paste and Worcestershire sauce.

When the mixture is well-blended, stir in the stock and cook for 5 minutes, stirring freqently. Make a slurry with the cornstarch and water, and stir it into the sauce to thicken it. Add the parsley. Season with salt and pepper to taste, and cook over medium heat until reduced by 1/4. Remove the bay leaf.

 

ESTOMAC MULÂTRE
(or "Stage Planks")

This bread makes the famous "stage planks" or ginger cakes, sold by the old darkies around New Orleans, in the old Creole days, to those of their own race and to little white children. The ancient Creoles, fond of giving nicknames, gave to this stiff ginger cake the name of "Estomac Mulâtre", or "The Mulatto’s Stomach", meaning that it was only fit for the stomach of a mulatto to digest.
1 Cup of Molasses
1 Cup of Sour Milk (buttermilk?)
1 Tablespoonful of Ground Ginger
1 Gill of Lard (1 gill = 1/2 cup, or 4 ounces)
3 Cups of Flour
1 Teaspoonful of Baking Soda

Melt the molasses, lard and ginger together and blend well. When thoroughly melted and warmed, beat for about ten minutes. Then dissolves the soda in a tablespoonful of boiling water and add to the molasses; mix it thoroughly, and then add the flour, using good judgment and adding just enough of the three cups of sifted flour to make a still batter; beat thoroughly and vigorously. Have ready several greased, shallow pans; pour the mixture into them and bake for ten minutes in a quick oven.

 

Quiche Lorraine  (serves  24-30) For your brunch party

5 pounds of bacon
One big or two medium onions, minced
One pint whipping cream
One block Swiss cheese, shredded
6 to 10 eggs
1 tablespoon dry Mustard
1 tablespoon Ginger (ground)
1 tablespoon Nutmeg (ground)
5-6 drops of Tabasco
salt and pepper to taste
4-5 pie shells
Butter

Fry and drain the bacon well (lots of paper towels), Crumble the bacon.
Saute the onion in butter until the center is clear and the edges start to brown. Drain well in a strainer lined with paper towels.

In a large mixing bowl, whip the cream, nutmeg, ginger, dry mustard, and Tabasco. Add and whip in the eggs, onion (cooled), bacon (cooled), and cheese.

Pour into pie shells and bake in a preheated oven at 375 degrees for 25 to 35 minutes. Place into gallon zip-lock freezer bags after cooling (don’t cook these completely). Re-heat at 375 degrees, and serve with champagne, a light Riesling, or just orange juice!

Spoon the sauce onto warm plates, and center a veal escallop on each. Place grits on the side of the meat, ladle additional sauce over the grits and meat. Garnish with parsley and a few capers. Serves 8.

Mark Boudreaux’s Cajun Jambalaya

Posted: January 30, 2017 in Recipes
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Jambalaya, a Cajun/Creole dish, is perhaps the most versatile main dish that Louisiana has to offer. The most important thing with this dish is to use the right equipment; any heavy bottomed cast iron pot or Dutch oven.

jambalayaIngredients

1 pound Andouille (Cajun) or mild smoked pork sausage, sliced 1/4-inch thick
1 1/2 pound boneless skinless chicken thigh meat, cubed
1 pound ground Italian sausage (mild)
1 pound cubed ham
2 cups onions, diced
1 cup bell pepper
2 tbsp minced fresh garlic
1/2 cup Old Bays Seafood seasoning (in all), divided
1/2 tbsp ground black pepper
1/2 tbsp white pepper
1/2 tbsp red pepper
3/4 tbsp thyme leaves
3/4 tbsp basil leaves
3 to 4 medium bay leaves
5 cups chicken stock
1 beer
3 cups long grain rice
1/2 cup chopped parsley leaves

Directions

Season chicken thighs generously with Old Bay the night before.

Use high heat to preheat the pot and add the sausage. With a large spoon, constantly move the sausage from the bottom of the pot. Brown the sausage but be careful not to burn the meat; remove sausage.

Using excess sausage drippings, brown the chicken on all sides (you may need to add some oil to pan to sauté). Again use the spoon to scrape the meat from sticking and burning to the bottom of the pot. Be careful not to over cook the thigh meat to the point that it shreds; remove thighs.

Add Italian sausage and start to brown adding onions and bell peppers when sausage is halfway browned. (You may need to add a little oil again).

Add red, black and white peppers to mixture and cook until veggies are translucent, about 5-7 minutes over medium-high heat. Again use the spoon to scrape the meat from sticking and burning to the bottom of the pot.

Add the ham and garlic and cook for another minute stirring and scraping bottom of pot to not scorch garlic. Add the remaining Old Bay seasoning, thyme, basil and bay leaves; stir. Return chicken and sausage to pot; mix and fold. Cook over low heat for 10 minutes. This will give the seasonings time to release their oils and flavors.

Add beer to deglaze pan scraping about 2 minutes. Add the stock and bring to a boil. Add the rice and fold in. Return to a slow boil and cook uncovered for about 5 minutes stirring and scraping pan bottom so rice does not stick and burn to pan bottom; mix in parsley. Reduce heat to the lowest possible setting and simmer, covered, for at least 30-35 minutes. Do not remove the cover while the rice is steaming.

After uncovering there may be some liquid remaining on top. Fold the rice in (DO NOT STIR). Turn off heat and let stand till liquid is absorbed. Remove bay leaves. Enjoy!

Classic Boudin (Boudoin)

Posted: January 30, 2017 in Recipes
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I bet you thought I was going to leave you hanging for those who cannot get Boudin for the Boudin balls recipe previously posted

This is the best classic boudin out there. Boudin is also spelled “boudoin.” Both are proper spellings of the same classic Cajun dish.

boudinIngredients

10 lbs pork roast (pork butt roast works)
4 medium onions
5 shallots
2 bell peppers
3 bunches green onion, chopped fine
1 bunch fresh parsley, chopped fine
1 tsp white pepper
2 tbsp salt
1 1/2 tbsp black pepper
5 tbsp cayenne
9 3/4 cup cooked rice
1 package of casing

Directions

In a large stockpot combine the pork roast, 5 whole shallots, 3 whole onions, and 2 whole bell peppers with enough water to cover the entire contents of pot. Boil until the meat begins to separate from the bone. Remove roast from water and then trim the fat from meat. Reserve stock.

With a meat grinder, grind together the meat with the boiled onions, shallots and peppers. Also grind in one additional raw onion.

Return the meat mixture to the pot and add the green onion and parsley, both chopped fine. Add the white pepper, salt, black pepper and cayenne. Stir thoroughly.

Add the cooked rice to the mixture and keep the consistency "wet" but not too wet to handle. Stuff the boudoin mixture into the casing, make boudoin balls or eat as a rice dressing. Boudoin is often enjoyed with cracklins.

Because this recipe makes a substantial amount of boudoin, most of it will likely be frozen for future use. To thaw the boudoin, heat water to boiling in a large pot and place boudoin in the pot and boil for 10 minutes. Remove and serve. Or, if making boudoin balls, roll in a small amount of breadcrumbs before freezing. To thaw, deep fat fry until golden brown or cook in the oven at 350 for 20 minutes turning balls once.

Boudin Balls

Posted: January 30, 2017 in Recipes
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deep_fried_boudin_ballsIngredients

Boudin
Crushed crackers
2 eggs (optional)
1/4 to 1/2 cup milk (optional)
Salt, cayenne, black pepper, to taste
Oil for frying

Directions

Make your boudin, see our recipe. Or, if using the store purchased variety, remove the meat mixture from the casing. Roll the mixture into balls a little smaller than an egg; actually any size.

There are two ways to make these and two ways to cook them.
Method 1. Crush your crackers to a fine meal consistency and season to taste. Or you can buy any flavored crackers. Take the boudin balls and roll them in the cracker meal. Refrigerate for 1 to 2 hours.Heat the cooking oil until a small amount of flour dropped in sizzles on top of the oil. Drop the boudin ball and fry until golden brown. Place on paper towels to drain. Serve warm but it tastes great even when cold.OR preheat oven to 375 degrees. Place the balls on a cookie sheet and cook for 20 to 25 minutes until golden brown, turning halfway thru the cooking process.

Method 2. Combine the milk and egg in a glass bowl. Set aside.Crush your crackers to a fine meal consistency, season to taste. Or you can use flavored crackers. Roll the boudin balls in the cracker meal. Season to taste.Take the boudoin ball and first coat with the milk and egg mixture; then dredge in the cracker mixture. (You could do this step twice to get a really thick coating.) Place on a plate and refrigerate for 1 to 2 hours.Heat the cooking oil until a small amount of flour dropped in sizzles on top of the oil. Drop the boudin ball and fry until golden brown. Place on paper towels to drain. Serve warm but it tastes great even when cold.

Pork rinds compliments this dish very well.